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SPEAKERS & SESSIONS

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Meet the Speaker:
Bob Williamson,
Strategic Work Systems

Session: Asset Management Culture Change: Leadership’s Top Priority

 

SPEAKER

Bob Williamson, Principal, Strategic Work Systems

Robert Williamson is a workplace consultant, educator, and author with experience in more than 500 plants and facilities in 50 different industry types. His primary focus on the people-side of manufacturing and operations reliability has been documented in more than 1,000 magazine articles and conference presentations. His decades-long experience in improving equipment performance and reliability spanning dozens of new plant startups, operations and maintenance training, and strategic-focused culture change give his presentations a real-world perspective. From 25 years of studying NASCAR race teams Robert can also dissect and explain their pursuit of 1200-percent reliability as a model for modern Asset Management strategies.

 
 

SESSION

Asset Management Culture Change: Leadership’s Top Priority

Bob Williamson, Principal, Strategic Work Systems

Asset Management activities, by design, span the entire life cycle of the facility, the equipment, or system. Whether referred to as ISO55000, Total Productive Maintenance, Terotechnology, or as an Asset Management system, a major shift in how the physical assets are managed from concept through operations/maintenance and decommissioning represent a major paradigm shift for most capital-intensive businesses. An Asset Management culture must cut across the traditional organization silos – engineering, procurement, construction, installation, human resources, operations, and maintenance – to develop the most effective, lowest total cost of ownership, managed risk asset deployment strategy. The transition from a traditional business culture to an Asset Management culture is the responsibility of top-level executive management. Recognizing and communicating the big opportunity to manage physical assets differently and setting new expectations must be addressed as a major strategic policy shift, not just another “improvement program” or project. This session will point out the pathways to success and the pitfalls encountered along with way.

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